Show Synopsis

"Are you really a thief?" That's the question that has haunted fourteen-year-old Ezekiel Blast all his life. But he's not a thief, he just has a talent for finding things. Not a superpower--a micropower. Because what good is finding lost bicycles and hair scrunchies, especially when you return them to their owners and everyone thinks you must have stolen them in the first place? If only there were some way to use Ezekiel's micropower for good, to turn a curse into a blessing. His friend Beth thinks there must be, and so ...

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KindigBlog

Sep 28, 2019

Disappointing

Ezekiel Bliss has a micropower - he can find lost objects and return them to their owners. But when an FBI Agent asks for help on a missing person's case Ezekiel's power is put to the ultimate test.

Having loved Enders Game when I was younger, I was excited to read something new from Orson Scott Card. However, Lost and Found seemed to fall a bit flat - I wasn't really sure what it was trying to be. There was an element of sci-fi introduced via the weird micropowers - I liked Ezekiels ability but all the rest didn't quite seem to match up to his. It felt like Scott Card had a great idea for his main character but then ran out of ideas trying to extend it to everyone else. There's a crime element to the story as well which I did enjoy - the kidnapping story line together with Ezekiel's power was interesting and fast paced. Then there was a kind of coming of age/embracing who you are/learning to love someone part which to me just felt awkward. Beth and Ezekiel's relationship felt very two dimensional - the dialogue was clunky and felt forced and at times they spoke like children who were a lot younger than the 14 years old they were supposed to be.

There was also a lot of unnecessary dialogue which I found myself skipping over - repetitive conversations that didn't go anywhere or lines that felt too much like they were trying to be intellectual or witty but didn't quite hit the mark. There were a couple of jarring remarks in the book to sexuality as well that I found a little dangerous in a young adult book - implying that Ezekiel would have to be 'brain-dead or completely not-male' to not notice a female character's breasts for example. There is one part of the book that suddenly takes a turn for the creepy which I really enjoyed but wish that one of the characters involved was explored in more depth from this (no spoilers).

Overall Lost and Found was a bit of a disappointment - it has potential but clunky dialogue and stilted characters meant it didn't really work for me. Thank you to NetGalley & Blackstone Publishing for the chance to read the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

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