Out of the Dust

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In a series of poems, fifteen-year-old Billie Jo relates the hardships of living on her family's wheat farm in Oklahoma during the dust bowl years of the Depression.

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tudisbest

Jan 28, 2011

great book

this book should be in every school and should be read by students and teachers

Tarissa

May 25, 2010

Dust Bowl Times

"Out of the Dust" is a fictional account of one girl's life in Oklahoma, during the hardships of the great Dust Bowl. Billie Jo's story is written through her own eyes, in the form of freestyle poetry.
This book is unique in it's own way. It somewhat reminds me of fictional books that are written in diary form, yet this book is still very different than even that.

The storyline:
There's one thing that Billie Jo really loves in life. It's playing the piano. Feeling the keys underneath her fingers. It seems to take her away from the grimy dirt, the dust in her eyes, and the sand dunes that daily pile up higher.

Neighbors give up on their farms. Dear friends move away, in search of a better place to live. A devastating accident takes it's course in Billie Jo's own family. She blames everything on the dust storms. They have ruined her life.

The only thing she wants to do now, is to sweep all the dust out of her heart permanently.

waller66

Dec 31, 2009

Read book

Written in the first person point of view, we learn about how the main character is able to not only survive during the Dust Bowl, but comes out a better person. A historical fiction book that depicts what it was really like in Oklahoma. An easy read for 6th grade students.

Karen69

Aug 4, 2008

excellant

The school I was subbing for used this book as part of their study on the era of history discribed in the book. The students enjoyed the book and had good discussions

sd6161

Sep 30, 2007

Embrace the Light

Told by Karen Hesse with freedom and resonance, Out of the Dust allows the reader a view through the eyes of a child. Billy Jo, who is but 14 years old and struggling between the everyday mystical transition of adolescence and the reality of survival during the Depression era dust-bowl. A time in United States history when children were often thrust into appalling situations and compelled to make decisive measures regarding life choices. Hesse's writing style balances both the tragedy and triumph of the human spirit in such a way as to offer a multifacited opportunity for teachers and students as they transition from elementary reading to various forms of classic American literature.

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