This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession

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Neuroscientist and professional musician Levitin presents a fascinating exploration of the relationship between music and the mind--and the role of melodies in shaping our lives. Photos throughout.

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zachklein

Jun 17, 2010

quite interesting

well written, much information but easy to digest.

BillinNH

May 13, 2010

More brain than I thought

As a music lover with little or no musical knowledge I thought this would fill in the gaps. Undoubtedly it would but it is not an easy read and not for the faint of heart. For the amatuer, it's a tough one. I think I will continue my search for a book about music written for music lovers whose desire to learn isn't for quite this much. A person with a good background in music might find this a treasure.

myfloridasun

Apr 30, 2009

Great Reading

Interesting combination of music and its effect on our brains. It has long been known that music can actually heal people's emotional states (1 Samuel 16:23) and bring them back to health from amnesia ... like Melody Gardot. Great reading!

BookFun

May 6, 2008

Terrific insights

This book has fascinating information about the relationships between music and the way we think and process sensory input. Although much of the discussion of music theory would be well known to musicians, it provides a solid basis for relating auditory perception to the physics of sound and the physiology of the brain. Certainly this does not qualify as a superficial consideration of how music is received and understood by our minds.

beatus35

Jan 6, 2008

very disappointing

I purchased this book based on an NPR interview and brief description (which--believe me--taught me a lesson). Mr. Levitin is obviously a person passionately engaged in pursuing the mysteries of human response to musical impulse. Astonishingly, his awareness of music is pretty much limited to what will go down in history as late 20th century pop--not exactly a scientific baseline for assessing global (i.e. over and above American baby-boomer generation) interaction between brain and music.

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