Sailing Alone Around the World

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Slocum's account of his epic round-the-world voyage in 1895 in the 37-foot sloop "Spray", remains as one of the major feats of single-handed voyaging. Starting from Boston on April 24th, 1895, Slocum crossed the Atlantic to Gibraltar only to discover that he would have to change his route. He then crossed the Atlantic a second time, following Magellan's course southwestwards, sailed through the Strait, traversed the Pacific and Indian Oceans, rounded the Cape of Good Hope and crossing the Atlantic the third time, dropped ...

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Worth G

Aug 25, 2015

He was the first

Today, lots of people have sailed around the world solo. But Joshua Slocum was the first. His story is interesting and told with a sly sense of humor that makes it very readable today.

I bought a second copy of this book from Alibris to donate to my daughter's summer house for others to enjoy.

[emailprotected]

Nov 17, 2014

a real sailor

What he did was not easy but he also did not have to contend with boating traffic, supertankers, flotsam of ship parts and containers, so in many ways Slocums trip was easier than todays circumnavigators would be. But his book gives modern sailors a glimpse into the past and is a must read for anyone interested in the oceans.

seanieman

Nov 4, 2010

Classic story of circumnavigation when foul weather gear was oilskins, cold weather clothing was wool and your communication up link was the stars. Unbelievable tale, told first hand.

PreacherDavidPotts

Jun 18, 2009

inspiring true story

Anyone who has spent much time on the water, or ever longed to sail will find this book to be a great inspiration. The casualness with which he treats many of the frightful circumstances through which he bore up should embolden the hearts of readers who are tired of living in a culture of victimhood blended with political correctness. This is a great book to read. Read it yourself or read it to your children.

RiverBoy

May 16, 2007

Island's and continents around the world

This book contains the story of Joshua Slocum, a sailor unwilling or unable to adapt to the coming of steamboats, who, in the late 1890's, rehabilitates a decripit boat and puts to sea to circumnavigate the world.

He crosses the Atlantic then heads south recrossing the Atlantic on his way to the Magellan Straits. Troubles ensue with bad weather and the indigenous Fuegians. He crosses the Pacific, the Indian and on home again.

If you are expecting a book with soul searching, clear prose explaining what 42 days at sea by yourself feels like, or the joy and beauty of the natural world, look elsewhere. The reader isn't even treated to a treatise on why tradition triumphs over technology.

Much of the book ends up being a litany of Joshua's time on shore visiting with Governors, Presidents, Generals and the like. You would assume from this book that the boat was little more than a means to bridge the distances between one island and another.

If you want epics about man against nature (or man against himself), I suggest Desparate Voyage or any of the many books on sailing in the polar regions.

In the end the book is a pleasant way to pass sometime, but not as satisfying as I hoped.

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