Show Synopsis

Albert and David Maysles, pioneers in the cinéma vérité movement of documentary filmmaking, chose for their subjects of this film a mother and daughter with celebrity connections. Edith Bouvier Beale and her daughter, Edie (or, as they are called by the brothers, Big Edie and Little Edie), are aunt and cousin to Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. In the early '70s, their 28-room mansion in Long Island's tony community of East Hampton was found to be a health hazard, and the two women, in their seventies and fifties, were ...

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LaurieAnnBaz

Aug 20, 2009

A Wonderful Train Wreck

I originally saw this movie on TV and proceeded to buy it. Big and little Edie Beale are intriguing. It's like watching a train wreck. You want to look away but you just can't. You almost can't believe that two such women, known to be rich and high society, can come to such poverty. Yet through all the deprivation you still can see and feel the aristocrat bred inside both women. This movie shows moments of happiness and deep sadness as you watch the women reflect on thier younger days, sometimes seemingly stepping back in time as they recall. Dispite the arguing and obvious eccentricities these two women are quite loveable. Mostly Little Edie who still has her school girl charms. After watching this film I am obessed with these wonderful women. They are inspiring women because of their plight. I suggest anyone interested in human nature and how expansive it's range can be, to watch this film. It might give you more compassion for people you don't quite understand in this world.

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